Carer's Allowance

Carer’s Allowance can be claimed if you care for someone who is severely disabled at least 35 hours a week and they get certain benefits. A supplement may be paid in Scotland.

You do not have to be related to, or live with, the person you care for but the care you give must be regular and substantial and amount to at least 35 hours each and every week.

The care you give can include:

  • helping with washing and cooking;
  • taking the person you care for to a doctor’s appointment;
  • helping with household tasks, like managing bills and shopping;
  • supervision

There may be implications to other benefits that you and the person you care for are getting if you claim carer’s allowance. See www.gov.uk/carers-allowance/effect-on-other-benefits

Carer’s Allowance is not a means-tested benefit and you do not have to have paid National Insurance contributions to qualify. However, the person you care for must already claim one of a certain set of benefits and you as the carer must also qualify by meeting a list of rules. To understand more of the eligibility requirements, visit www.gov.uk/carers-allowance/eligibility

You can still work and get Carer’s Allowance, as long as you spend at least 35 hours in your caring role. For details on this aspect of the benefit see www.gov.uk/carers-allowance/if-youre-working

Carer’s Allowance is claimed on-line on the GOV.UK website. For details see www.gov.uk/carers-allowance/how-to-claim. As with all government benefits it is important to report any change in circumstance. The details on this in relation to Carer’s Allowance can be found at: www.gov.uk/careers-allowance/further-information

Similar to Carer’s Allowance in Scotland there is a yearly grant that is awarded specifically to young carers. For eligibility requirements and other guidance on this grant visit www.mygov.scot/young-carer-grant